Jean-Baptiste Mouret on the cover of Nature

28 May 2015

Robots could help our society in many situations like for example searching for survivors after natural disasters or calling the fire services in the event of a forest fire. However they will go no further than research laboratories until they are capable of functioning when damaged.

In a new paper in the journal Nature (“Robots that can adapt like animals”), researchers from the Institute for Intelligent Systems and Robotics (CNRS/UPMC) and the LORIA, Lorraine Research Laboratory in Computer Science and its Applications, (CNRS/Inria/University of Lorraine), with the help from a researcher at the University of Wyoming, show how to make robots automatically recover from injury in less than two minutes. A video of the work shows a six-legged robot that adapts to keep walking even if two of its legs are broken (https://youtu.be/T-c17RKh3uE). It also shows a robotic arm that learned how to correctly place an object even with several broken motors.

Their results were published in the May 28th 2015 issue of Nature.

Robots will one day provide tremendous benefits to society, such as in search and rescue and putting out forest fires, but not until they can learn to keep working if they become damaged. Researchers at the Institute for Intelligent Systems and Robotics (CNRS/UPMC) and the Lorraine Research Laboratory in Computer Science and its Applications, (CNRS/Inria/University of Lorraine) have shown how robots can automatically adapt to damage in under two minutes. Their results were published in the May 28th 2015 issue of Nature.

Here is the full press release disseminated by Inria.

(source: CNRS press office)

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