Colloquium : Hermann Ney

18 January 2017

Loria’s colloquium is coming back !

After the great success of the colloquium that took place during the Loria’s 40th aniversary, we reiterate these good scientific moments.

The first event of the year will happen on Friday, January 27th at 1.30 pm in the Amphitheater, with Hermann Ney, full professor of computer science at RWTH Aachen University. His presentation is entitled : “Human Language Technology and Machine Learning : From Bayes Decision Theory to Deep Learning“.

Abstract:

Spoken and written language and the processing of language are considered to be inherently human capabilities. With the advent of computing machinery, automatic language processing systems became one of the corner-stone goals in artificial intelligence. Typical tasks involve the recognition and understanding of speech, the recognition of text images and the translation between languages.

The most successful approaches to building automatic systems to date are based on the idea that a computer learns from examples (possibly very large amounts) and uses plausibility scores rather than externally provided categorical rules. Such approaches are based on statistical decision theory and machine learning. The last 40 years have seen a dramatic progress in machine learning for human language technology.
This talk will present a unifying view of the underlying statistical methods including the recent developments in deep learning and artificial neural networks.

 

Biography:

Hermann Ney is a full professor of computer science at RWTH Aachen University, Germany. His main research interests lie in the area of statistical classification, machine learning and human language technology and specific applications to speech recognition, machine translation and handwriting recognition. In particular, he has worked on dynamic programming and discriminative training for speech recognition, on language modelling and on phrase-based approaches to machine translation. His work has resulted in more than 700 conference and journal papers (h-index 83, 36000 citations; estimated using Google scholar). He and his team contributed to a large number of European (e.g. TC-STAR, QUAERO, TRANSLECTURES, EU-BRIDGE) and American (e.g. GALE, BOLT, BABEL) joint projects.

Hermann Ney is a fellow of both IEEE and ISCA (Int. Speech Communication Association). In 2005, he was the recipient of the Technical Achievement Award of the IEEE Signal Processing Society. For the years 2010-2013, he was awarded a senior DIGITEO chair at LIMIS/CNRS in Paris, France. In 2013, he received the award of honour of the International Association for Machine Translation. In 2016, he was awarded an ERC advanced grant.

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